EL CHALTÉN.- El escalador alemán Fabián Buhl, de 29 años, subió recientemente la ruta Ragni por la cara oeste del Cerro Torre y tras completar la travesía se lanzó en parapente desde la cumbre, convirtiéndose así en el primero en lanzarse en parapente sin haber utilizado antes un helicóptero para llegar a la cima.

Así lo reportó la cuenta @patagoniavertical y detalló que subió junto a Laura Tiefehthaler y Raphaela Haug, quienes debieron retirar las grandes cantidades de escarcha de la ruta y marcaron así el primer ascenso de la temporada, a quienes acompañaba un equipo de escaladores franceses. Según reportan, Buhl navegó por debajo de la cumbre y despegó al amanecer para evitar vientos térmicos con una línea enredada. Le llevó 17 minutos volar hasta debajo del glaciar Torre.

«Fabi eligió volar muy temprano en la mañana para evitar los vientos de intercambio térmico. El despegue no estuvo exento de emoción. Cuando dio los primeros pasos, se dio cuenta de que una de las líneas estaba enredada, pero sabía que si se detenía, le costaría mucho recuperar la psique para intentarlo de nuevo, así que siguió corriendo, esperando que la línea se desenredara mientras cargaba. el planeador (no lo hizo). Después de un vuelo de 17 minutos, aterrizó en el glaciar Torre, cerca del «nunatak». Deseó haberse quedado en el aire por más tiempo, pero sus manos se enfriaron bastante (la línea de congelación estaba a 2000m)», detalla @patagoniavertical en sus redes sociales.

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Yesterday morning, before the sun peeked over the horizon, and while most of us were asleep, @fabi_buhl pulled this off!! . Fabi is the first person to fly off the summit of Cerro Torre after climbing up it (more historic details later). Together with @laura_tiefenthaler and @raphaela.haug, they climbed the Ragni route, cleaning copious amounts of rime as they “re-opened” the route during the first ascent of the season. Working with a French team composed by Christoph, JB and Matthieu, they “opened” (cleaned) all but the last 15 meters of the final pitch. . Fabi chose to fly off very early in the morning so as to avoid thermal exchange winds. The take-off was not without excitement. As he took the first steps, he realized that one of the lines was tangled, but he knew that if he stopped, he would have a hard time recovering psyche to try again, so he kept running, hoping the line would untangle as he loaded the glider (it did not). After a 17 minute flight, he landed on the Torre Glacier, in the vicinity of the “nunatak”. He wished he would have stayed in the air longer, but his hands got quite cold (the freezing line was at 2000m). . Thirty one years ago, in 1988, Matthias and Michael Pinn climbed the Supercanaleta and flew off the summit of Cerro Fitz Roy. Four days later, together with Uwe Passler they climbed the Compressor route, again carrying their paragliders, but were unable to fly off the summit due to poor weather. A week later they hitchhiked a ride back to the summit in a helicopter, and all three flew off. In 1991, Roman Tschurtschenthaler also hitchhiked a ride to the summit in a helicopter, and flew off. . Huge congrats to Fabi, and kudos to the Pinn brothers, whose 1988 climb-and-fly of Cerro Fitz Roy, and vision, was well ahead of it’s time. . Fabi flew an @airdesignparagliders Susi 3 16m2 . #cerrotorre #paragliding #patagonia #climbandfly

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Quién es es Fabi Buhl

Días antes que Buhl llegue la Patagonia se estrenó el tercer y último episodio de la temporada 4 de La Sportiva Living Legends, Fabian Buhl fue el protagonista. Allí relata sobre su deseo de estar solo en las montañas y lo que siente en cada una de estas hazañas que realiza

En la @patagoniavertical recuerdan que en 1988, Michael y Matthias Pinn volaron desde la cima de Fitz Roy después de escalar la Supercanaleta. Luego fueron ascendidos hasta la cima del Cerro Torre en helicóptero desde donde se lanzaron en parapente.

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As a follow up to @fabi_buhl’s paraglider flight from Cerro Torre after climbing the Ragni Route, here are a few photos from Matthias and Michael Pinn’s #climbandfly from Cerro Fitz Roy in 1988, when paragliders were quite crude and dangerous. Matthias and Michael climbed the Supercanaleta, taking two days, including one bivy in a severe storm which they spent wrapped in their paragliders. Here is an excerpt of their account (edited for clarity). . “Because of a storm, we have already resigned ourselves to rappelling the Franco-Argentine route and are looking for the start of the rappels, when suddenly we see thermal clouds rising in the steppe. To the north of the summit I see a ten-meter-wide snow groove, 40 degrees steep, interspersed with granite blocks. It is immediately clear to us that this must be our starting place. We decide to fly. Scraps of white mist rise from the steppe, making the updrafts visible. The clouds of condensation remain like huge snow flags on the leeward side of the Fitz Roy, enveloping us. Michael places his paraglider. He waits until a slight updraft allows for an attempt. We are both mentally tense. Michael raises both hands, the lines stretch, a short pull, the paraglider rises, he starts running. Five, six concentrated steps, the airspeed has been reached, he takes off and flies. We feel an incredible relief. After a 30-minute flight, we land in the Piedra del Fraile.” . Four days later, with Uwe Passler, they climbed the Compressor route on Cerro Torre carrying their paragliders, but poor weather prevented them from flying. Later they hitchhiked a ride back to the summit in a helicopter, and all three flew off. . Thanks to @mileronga from the Linguistics Department at @uniinsbruck for sending me the original pdf of the article, and to her professors Gerhard Rampl and Claudia Posch @clowdyfog for their work on the mountain linguistics corpus that allowed me to access the text of the article while sitting in Chalten, and in barely two clicks. . #cerrotorre #paragliding #patagonia #climbandfly

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